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Tuesday, May 01, 2007

Yushchenko Fires Stanik, Pshenychny for Unprofessional Conduct

President Yushchenko Tuesday discharged two Constitutional Court Justices for “breach of oath,” as stated in his decree. According to the Secretariat of the President, Deputy Chief Justice Valery Pshenychny overstepped his authority when he assigned Justice Susanna Stanik to the task of preparing the briefs on the dissolution case. Justice Stanik remains under investigation on charges of bribery.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Stanik is under investigation by whom?

SBU? yes but they cannot open a case against her.
General Prosecutor? did they open a case? I thought they refused.

Luida

Taras said...

That’s correct, the Office of the Prosecutor General refused to file charges against Stanik due to “lack of evidence.” Shortly, Prosecutor Medvedko secluded himself in the hospital, which suggests that he couldn’t bring himself to do more for the Coalition.

Meanwhile, the President appointed Svyatoslav Piskun, PRU, the new prosecutor general and fired Justice Susanna Stanik. A number of analysts believe that Piskun, a veteran prosecutor general, realized his ambition through some sort of political allegiance to Yushchenko. Let’s wait and see.

Anonymous said...

Gotta love Levko's coverage of the ongoing developments...

I replied briefly at my blog here.

dlw

Taras said...

I’ve read Levko’s update:)

I’ve read Levko’s update:) Until proven otherwise, I shall view the Piskun and the Havrysh appointments as Yushchenko-friendly by-products of the Holovaty syndrome, that is, weapons of last resort against an uncooperative Coalition. These two Kuchmen are a dyad of disgruntled fortune seekers who distanced themselves from the Yanukovych camp and placed their bets on Yushchenko.

Did you notice the power of healing that the Piskun appointment has had over the Central Election Commission?:) They now have a quorum! Apparently, some Yanukovych-friendly members of that body have reconsidered their sick leave commitments. I get high just by watching Havrysh bend over backwards and wax eloquent on Yushchenko’s high potential:) Meanwhile, the Coalition is bracing itself for elections and covering its electoral bases by raising the pensions and salaries of public employees. So much for Azarov’s poetic crusade against squandermania:)!

The sad thing is I doubt that prostitution will become any more significant an issue than poverty itself. With a monthly income of a few hundred dollars or less, most Ukrainians feel like prostitutes themselves. That explains the popularity of prostitution and its uglier variations, the sex slave trade & tourism. These social phenomena have thrived on weak institutions, a strong supply of destitute young women, and an equally strong demand from libidinous higher-income countries. They have also blossomed into a major source of income for international organized crime and local law enforcement.

David said...

Yeah, but we're talking about children?

Well, you know you're system better than I do.

Taras K's post both predicts Yuschenko's success and bemoans the extent to which Ukraine is still captive to the Soviet mentality, with justice for the serious wrongs of the past left at this point to the next life....
http://blog.taraskuzio.net/2007/05/04/a-weird-day/#comment-9758

dlw

Taras said...

Unfortunately, yes, we're talking about children too.

Shows you how dysfunctional our system is, doesn’t it? That’s what happens when you have a country that can’t fully support its children and yet has seven slots on Forbes’ billionaires list.

I left a comment on Kuzio's blog.

Anonymous said...

I chided Taras for being snobby to you, when you had correctly pinpointed his minor error...

dlw

Taras said...

Thank you, David:) My corrective comment probably caught him in a bad mood, but his response didn’t offend me at all:)

“To make mistakes is human; to stumble is commonplace; to be able to laugh at yourself is maturity.”

—William A. Ward

Anonymous said...

This is elmer.

Who gave Stanik's mother the $12 million worth of property?

And what did she do to deserve it?

Is there any clearer indication that ONE of the things that Ukraine needs is an INDEPENDENT judiciary, with a Code of Ethical Conduct, as in other civilized countries?

Taras said...

Elmer, my best guess is she won a limited-issue lottery for the elderly sponsored by the current cabinet:)

Let us hope that the details will come to light and the issue will not die quietly amid the tug-of-war over the elections date.

Anonymous said...

Robert Harris' "Fatherland" is an intriguing book as it posits the "what if" world of Germany not having lost WWII but won and all of Eastern Europe (inc. Ukraine) under German rule. Every so-called "Neo-Nazi" in Ukraine should read for an idea of what life would have been like under Nazi rule and people of the lower races being made to serve their betters.

Luida