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Thursday, June 19, 2008

Anti-NATO Slide Film Shown in Soviet High School

NATO IS A THREAT TO THE WORLD
A Slide Film for Grade 10



In Russian, the word мир (mir) has two meanings: world and peace.

This slide film mixes facts and figures with Soviet propaganda.

The use of “Vremya vpered” (“Forward, Time!”) as part of the soundtrack surprised me. In the ‘80s, this piece of instrumental music by Georgi Sviridov served as an intro to the Soviet news program Vremya (Time). (If you play piano, you can try this.)


I guess the soundtrack found its way into the video by the person who shared it, not by the anti-NATO propagandists. The slide film dates back to 1985.

Video uploaded from: http://censor.net.ua/go/offer/ResourceID/87722.html

2 comments:

elmer said...

This almost one-note piece of music sounds exactly like the only word that rooskie sovoks know how to say:

NYET, NYET, NYET, NYET

Whatever it is, the rooskie sovoks are against it.

They don't know why - they're against it.

http://blog.kievukraine.info/2008/06/russian-ukrainian-relations-reveal.html

Because of Russia’s unreformed world view and historically unchanged attitude toward Ukraine, it is unable to discuss Ukraine’s drive to join NATO rationally but only in emotional and hysterical terms, using words such as “treason.”

Such language was evident during Putin’s speech to the NATO-Russia Council, where he challenged Ukraine’s territorial integrity and right to exist.

Taras said...

I actually like the music.

As a Soviet-born Ukrainian, I tend to associate it with my childhood and my interest in news.

But as we all know, Soviet news rarely supplied the audience with balanced and objective information, at least until perestroika reached its advanced stages.

“There is no pravda (truth) in Izvestia (news), and no izvestia in Pravda,” as the joke went.

From a public relations perspective, “Vremya, vpered!” clearly does not belong in this slide film.

It’s the theme to a 1967 film about working-class people who were building a plant during the industrialization of the 1930s. At that time, they didn’t make movies about the Holodomor, nor did they make movies about oligarchs.

The musical composition of “Vremya, vpered!” served to create an emotional appeal, a mental picture of progress. That’s why I raised the issue in the first place.

Speaking of Putin, don’t miss this video!

Voiceover: The President of Russia, Vladim…Dmitry Anatolyevich Medvedev!